วิเคราะห์บอล ราคา_สมัครได้เงินฟรี_พนันออนไลน์ฟรี https://www.google.com//48f/category/bios/karl-nerenberg Karl Nerenberg joined rabble in 2011 to cover news for the rest of us from Parliament Hill. Karl has been a journalist and filmmaker for over 25 years, including eight years as the producer of the CBC Radio show "The House." In his work, he has dealt with a great variety of subjects: from civil war in Central America, to the crisis in South Africa's Apartheid system. During his time at CBC, and its French language counterpart, Radio-Canada, Karl directed and wrote numerous documentaries and long-form television reports for such programs as "Le Point" and "Actuel" and "The Journal." Karl also founded and, for five years, edited the magazine "Federations: What's new in federalism worldwide." Karl has been awarded a Gemini award, a Best International Reportage Series award (from "la Communaut¨¦ des televisions francophones"), and a CBC Radio Award for Best New Series (for "C'est la vie"), among others. In 2010-2011, he wrote, produced and co-directed (with Malcolm Hamilton) "Never Come Back," a documentary on the Roma communities in Canada and in Europe. Karl can be reached at karl@rabble.ca en Paul Dewar was a true champion of the little guy https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/02/paul-dewar-was-true-champion-little-guy <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/02/paul-dewar-was-true-champion-little-guy"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/5580908198_395c80bb38_z.jpg?itok=NE5lS2lb" width="1180" height="600" alt="Paul Dewar/Flickr" title="Paul Dewar/Flickr" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Longtime Ottawa Centre MP Paul Dewar succumbed to brain cancer on February 6. He was 56 years old. He was the NDP's foreign affairs critic from 2011 to 2015. In that capacity, he took positions on all the major international issues of the day, including whether or not Canada should support renewed U.S. military action in Iraq.</p> <p>But Dewar's passion was human rights. He doggedly championed the causes of people in far-flung places who were not always at the top of the media or political agenda.</p> <p>In 2010, Dewar took on an initiative started by his colleague, former Winnipeg MP Judy Wasylycia-Leis, to make costly, patent-protected prescription drugs available to people suffering from HIV/AIDs in some of the world's poorest countries.</p> <p>Dewar wanted generic drug companies to get, in effect, an exemption from patent rules so they could make life-saving medicines available to thousands of desperate and sick people in Africa?and elsewhere in the developing world. Dewar introduced a private member's bill to that effect, and got it through the House of Commons. Most opposition MPs and a number of Conservatives support the intiative.</p> <p>The bill never passed the Senate, however, and died when an election was called in 2011. When the NDP's H¨¦l¨¨ne Laverdi¨¨re tried to get a reworked version of Dewar's bill through the House in 2012, the?<a href="/48f/blogs/bloggers/karl-nerenberg/2012/11/parliament-votes-today-key-measure-provide-medicines-millions" target="_blank">Conservative majority blocked</a>?it.</p> <p>Conservatives praised the humanitarian motives of the NDP's measure but worried about its potential negative effects on pharmaceutical research and development in Canada. They also feared any weakening of drug patent protection would annoy the European countries with which Canada was negotiating a giant trade deal. The pharmaceutical industry is huge and influential in Europe.</p> <p>When he spoke in the House of Commons to Laverdi¨¨re's bill, Dewar demonstrated the grassroots compassion and humanity that was characteristic of his entire career in public life.</p> <p>The Ottawa MP started by describing a recent visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo, where he witnessed advanced testing that allowed people to know whether or not they had HIV/AIDs, without shame or stigma. The next stop on his itinerary was not so encouraging, however. It was to a warehouse that was supposed to store drugs that combat HIV/AIDs</p> <p>"That warehouse was half-empty," Dewar told the House. "This was the place where the medicines were stored for the people who had been tested and identified as having the HIV virus, in some cases full-blown AIDS, and other diseases, were reliant upon. I was stunned. I asked where all the medicines were. They said that they could not get any. I asked why not, and they said it was because there were problems with patent barriers."</p> <p>"I will never forget it because we essentially gave people false hope," Dewar concluded. "We gave them the indication that we were going to be helping them out, but without providing treatment, we are essentially giving people notification of a death sentence."</p> <p><strong>Encouraging Canadian mining companies to do the right thing</strong></p> <p>A couple of years after his failed attempt to get life-saving medicines to AIDs suffers, Dewar put forward another private member's measure focused on forgotten, abused and exploited people far from his home riding.</p> <p>This bill was designed to help curtail trade in what are called conflict minerals. Those are the precious minerals, some of them very rare, that warring factions in unstable and strife-afflicted regions use to finance their bloody and brutal activities.</p> <p>Dewar's bill would have obliged Canadian companies operating in conflict regions, and most notably in central Africa, to follow due diligence when dealing with minerals that finance civil war and terror. Companies would have to conduct independent audits to determine the source of the minerals they acquire, in order to assure that none came from armed militia groups.</p> <p>In speaking to his bill, Dewar again evoked his experience in the Democratic Republic of Congo.</p> <p>"For the record, here are some of the facts," the NDP's foreign affairs critic said. "The conflict that has been raging in the Democratic Republic of Congo since?1998 is the deadliest conflict since World War II. In?2011, the number of rapes was estimated at?48, not per year, per month or per day, but per hour. Rape is used as a weapon of war. In?2012, 2 million people were displaced. That is approximately the equivalent of the combined population of Manitoba and Saskatchewan."</p> <p>As for the significance of the minerals his measure sought to regulate and control:</p> <p>"Conflict minerals generate $180 million per year for armed groups, literally keeping some militias in business. Up to 40 per cent of those working in the mines are children. These children, who are exploited and abused, are then prime targets for recruitment by armed groups."</p> <p>Dewar's private member's bill was moderate and pragmatic. It would not force Canadian companies to do anything. Its only weapon was moral sanction.?</p> <p>Still, it was too much for the governing Conservatives, who?<a href="/48f/blogs/bloggers/karl-nerenberg/2014/09/conservatives-kill-measure-to-cut-money-violent-militias-afric" target="_blank">voted it down</a>.?</p> <p>Dewar had little to gain politically from championing the causes of AIDs victims and exploited child miners in Africa. Few voters in his Ottawa Centre riding were preoccupied with those far-away issues.</p> <p>Dewar took up those causes, and invested considerable energy in them, because he had witnessed abuse, exploitation and injustice first hand and could not bear to sit by and do nothing about it.</p> <p>That was the kind of person he was.</p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p><em>Photo:?<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photoPaul Dewar/Flickrs/30484772@N08/5580908198/" target="_blank">Paul Dewar/Flickr</a></em></p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Thu, 07 Feb 2019 15:18:24 +0000 rabble staff 156896 at/48f /48f/news/2019/02/paul-dewar-was-true-champion-little-guy#comments Provincial NDP victory in Nanaimo is a defeat for pollsters https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/provincial-ndp-victory-nanaimo-defeat-pollsters <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/provincial-ndp-victory-nanaimo-defeat-pollsters"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/Sheila%20Malcolmson%201.jpg?itok=vVC4eqpD" width="1180" height="600" alt="Photo: Sheila Malcolmson/Facebook" title="Photo: Sheila Malcolmson/Facebook" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On January 28, as the voters in British Columbia¡¯s provincial riding of Nanaimo prepared to vote in a crucial byelection, Mainstreet Research came out with a poll showing the B.C. Liberal candidate ahead by 13 points.</p> <p>If the byelection had turned out that way, the combined forces of the NDP and the Greens would have lost their one-seat majority.</p> <p>But that is not what happened. On January 30, the NDP candidate, former federal MP Sheila Malcolmson, won by nearly 10 points. The Mainstreet poll from two days before the vote was wrong. In fact, it was 23 percentage points off the mark.</p> <p>The B.C. NDP minority government is safe, for now at least. As long as Premier John Horgan can keep the support of the Green Party, and his own caucus, he can stave off a new election.</p> <p>The Nanaimo result is important because it maintains a certain measure of stability in B.C. politics, at a time when the province has many challenges, not the least of which is to forge a healthier and more respectful relationship with its First Nations.</p> <p>But the byelection result, so at variance with the most recent poll, is also important for another reason. It should give those of us who play at political punditry pause.</p> <p>We tend to treat public opinion polling data as solid fact, based on what appears to be a scientific methodology. In reality, polls give us, at best, an incomplete and hazy view of the state of public opinion.</p> <p>And so, when they depict the challenges facing the political players and the choices facing the electorate, it is dangerous and unfair for journalists and analysts to give excessive weight to polling data.</p> <p><strong>Do polls accurately tell the current federal political story?</strong></p> <p>Currently, the pundits¡¯ consensus on the federal political state of affairs is very much poll-driven.</p> <p>Most recent polls show the Trudeau Liberals neck-and-neck with Andrew Scheer¡¯s Conservatives. Pundits attribute this result to the prime minister¡¯s missteps, such as his ill-fated trip to India, and to public resistance to the Liberal government¡¯s modest carbon tax.</p> <p>Polls also show the Greens to be on the ascent, somewhat, vis-¨¤-vis their result in the last federal election, which does not quite square with the view that there is widespread backlash against measures to deal with climate change.</p> <p>As for the New Democrats, most polls have them well below their 2015 election score of just below 20 per cent. Some polls have them in the low teens.</p> <p>Those numbers have led to the consensus view among professional observers that NDP leader Jagmeet Singh is not catching on with the electorate, does not connect with voters and, overall, is dragging down his party.</p> <p>There may be some truth to that view. The polls might, in fact, be capturing part of the real picture -- but, at best, it is almost only a small part. Not only are polls merely snapshots in time, they are limited in their view and scope. They can never accurately and fully reflect the complex and multi-layered texture of public opinion.</p> <p>To know what is going on in the public mind, we who work in what is becoming an endangered profession -- journalism --?must talk to and pay attention to real live members of the public, not just pollsters. And we should pay heed to the issues real people care about, and not focus exclusively on the horse-race numbers, the matter of who¡¯s up, who¡¯s down, who¡¯s ahead and who¡¯s a behind.</p> <p>The Nanaimo byelection was not an opinion poll. It entailed actual voters making a real choice.</p> <p>The poll-defying result is a bucket of cold water over the heads of the too-often smug and over-confident pollster community, and it should be a warning to those who base their political analyses to too great a degree on poll numbers.</p> <p>Headlines after the Mainstreet poll came out two days before the actual vote focused on the fragility of the NDP¡¯s hold on power.</p> <p>The morning after the byelection, the story, and the conversation around it, had completely changed. The headline in the <em>Vancouver Sun</em>, to cite just one example, read: ¡°NDP tightens grip on power with byelection win."</p> <p>There are federal byelections coming at the end of February and they, too, just might change the conversation ¨C in this case about the state of play on the federal political stage.</p> <p>Photo: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/SheilaMalcolmsonNDP/photos/a.788611477842798/2011250982245502/?type=3&amp;theater">Sheila Malcolmson/Facebook</a></p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Thu, 31 Jan 2019 15:23:50 +0000 rabble staff 156586 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/provincial-ndp-victory-nanaimo-defeat-pollsters#comments Response to Quebec mosque killings stands in stark contrast to arrest of teen in Kingston https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/response-quebec-mosque-killings-stands-stark-contrast-arrest-teen-kingston <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/response-quebec-mosque-killings-stands-stark-contrast-arrest-teen-kingston"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/Mosque%20shooting.jpg?itok=Z2pifmbS" width="1180" height="600" alt="Photo: Coastal Elite/Flickr" title="Photo: Coastal Elite/Flickr" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>January 29 marks the second anniversary of the Quebec City massacre, when a young man by the name of Alexandre Bissonnette walked into a mosque during evening prayers and started shooting worshippers at random. He killed six and injured 19.</p> <p>The day before this grim anniversary, a 16-year-old was arraigned in a court in Kingston, Ont., on charges related to terrorism.</p> <p>Although no violent acts were committed in the second case, in many ways the media, the criminal justice system and politicians treated the Kingston youth as a greater danger to public safety than the mosque shooter.</p> <p>Prior to the mosque shooting, Bissonnette had frequently expressed violent, far-right, racist and xenophobic views on social media, yet he was not, as far as we can tell, on the radar of any security service -- be it the S?ret¨¦ du Qu¨¦bec, CSIS or the RCMP.</p> <p>When authorities charged Bissonnette, it was only with murder and attempted murder, not with any terrorism-related offences. They made that choice notwithstanding the fact that the killer had stated quite clearly his motive for terrorizing a peaceful group of people at prayer was his burning hatred for Muslims.</p> <p>To invoke terrorism in such a case, the authorities explained, there would have had to be evidence of collaboration with some sort of organized terrorist group. There was no such evidence in Bissonnette¡¯s case.</p> <p>Two years later, in a Kingston court, the crown arraigned the 16-year-old youth for facilitating a terrorist activity, as defined by section 83.19 of the Canadian Criminal Code. ?</p> <p>There are very few known facts in the Kingston case, because the accused is a minor whose identity cannot be divulged. Lawyer and anti-terrorism expert Leah West analyzed the little we do know for CBC Radio¡¯s <em><a href="https://www.cbc.ca/listen/shows/the-house/episode/15666389">The House</a></em><em>.</em></p> <p>West noted that the criminal code section under which the youth was charged makes no reference to terrorist <em>organizations</em>. That is significant, she explained, because the crown chose <em>not </em>to charge the youth under another section, 83.2, which does specify activities <em>for the purposes of aiding a terrorist group.</em> Remember that in Bissonnette¡¯s case prosecutors elected not to impose terrorism charges precisely because they said the killer was not affiliated with any group.</p> <p>Based on what we know, it would be reasonable to surmise that the 16-year-old in Kingston had likely acted alone, or virtually alone, not as part of an organized conspiracy.</p> <p>It is a fact that police services sometimes use elaborate schemes and undercover operators to entrap people. Not too long ago, the courts in British Columbia dismissed a case against two marginalized people whom the police had lured into taking part in a goofy scheme to bomb the legislature.</p> <p>It is also a fact that a variety of police and security forces expended enormous efforts on the Kingston case.</p> <p>And in contrast to the Bissonnette case, spokespeople for those security forces have not been reluctant to characterize the Kingston case as an open-and-shut matter of terrorism, with significant implications for national security, to boot.</p> <p>Indeed, authorities have said there are international security implications in this case. The original tip-off came, they say, from the American FBI.</p> <p><strong>Some politicians could not resist an opportunity for partisan attacks</strong></p> <p>Two years ago, politicians were circumspect, non-partisan and solemn in their reaction to the horrific crimes of Bissonnette.</p> <p>In the case of the Kingston youth, however, at least some political figures have been quick to use it for partisan advantage.</p> <p>Conservative leader Andrew Scheer did not even wait for the arraignment before suggesting the accusations against one 16-year-old prove that Canada must re-examine its refugee screening system. ?</p> <p>Of course, we do not know anything about the identity or origins of the accused youth, except that he, apparently, speaks Arabic. That did not stop Scheer from exploiting the situation as a cudgel with which to beat the notionally too-soft-on-refugees Trudeau government.</p> <p>When an old-stock English- or French-speaking Canadian commits a crime, however brutal and bloody, we tend to see it as a crime and nothing more. In our collective eyes, the only guilty person is the perpetrator himself. His guilt does not extend to any group or community; nor does it pose a threat to the peace and order of society at large.</p> <p>We react that way even when, as in the Bissonnette case, the criminal himself loudly and proudly proclaims his fiercely ideological motives.</p> <p>The story is quite different when the accused person is someone who is, possibly, a recent arrival to Canada.</p> <p>In the Kingston case, we are dealing, at this point, with a vague and ill-defined criminal act. Whatever crime the accused might have been planning, he never consummated it. There was no act of violence. Nobody was injured, let alone killed. And yet, this case has engendered a national panic attack, complete with lurid headlines and breathless media reports.</p> <p>The phrase innocent until proven guilty is a clich¨¦, but it does have a real meaning.</p> <p>Politicians, the police and those of us in the media would be well advised to remember that phrase, and hew to it scrupulously, when talking about the accusations against this 16-year-old resident of Kingston.</p> <p>Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/fredisonfire/34914491036">Coastal Elite/Flickr</a></p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p>?</p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Tue, 29 Jan 2019 15:27:28 +0000 rabble staff 156491 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/response-quebec-mosque-killings-stands-stark-contrast-arrest-teen-kingston#comments Trudeau opens himself to political attacks over firing of McCallum https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/trudeau-opens-himself-political-attacks-over-firing-mccallum <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/trudeau-opens-himself-political-attacks-over-firing-mccallum"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/34178335420_8dd0518491_z.jpg?itok=aeVUy1JG" width="1180" height="600" alt="John McCallum photo courtesy Premier of Alberta/Flickr" title="John McCallum photo courtesy Premier of Alberta/Flickr" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On Saturday, January 26, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau fired his ambassador to China, John McCallum. Now, as Parliament resumes, the prime minister can expect some fairly harsh partisan attacks from his political rivals.</p> <p>Trudeau had resisted calls to fire the ambassador after McCallum undiplomatically told a group of journalists he thought the case for extraditing Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was weak.</p> <p>McCallum apologized for that statement ¨C but then spoke out again, this time expressing the hope that the U.S. would drop its case against Meng.</p> <p>That was too much for the government.</p> <p>It is one thing to try too hard to curry favour with the Chinese and, in so doing, undermine the independent Canadian judiciary. It is another to openly offend the Americans.</p> <p>China is still holding two Canadians on vague charges. And it is still, officially, planning to execute another. That Canadian, Robert Schellenberg, has just appealed his death sentence for drug dealing.</p> <p>For the time being, Canada will have no full-fledged ambassador to China. Career diplomat Jim Nickel, who had been McCallum¡¯s second in command, takes over as charg¨¦ d¡¯affaires, the top person when there is no accredited ambassador.</p> <p>The opposition parties, especially the Conservatives, will try to make political hay out of all this, although politicizing a foreign policy imbroglio is not only unseemly, it could be dangerous. Conservative leader Andrew Scheer appears to think he can win points in a competition with Trudeau as to who¡¯s most competent to manage foreign policy. Good luck with that.</p> <p><strong>Trudeau and Scheer agree on some foreign policy issues</strong></p> <p>On another foreign affairs front, that of the current conflict between Venezuelan president Nicol¨¢s Maduro and self-declared president, opposition leader Juan Guaido, Scheer and Trudeau are on the same page. They both refuse to recognize the legitimacy of Maduro¡¯s recent re-election.</p> <p>It is the NDP that is offside on Venezuela, although it does not have a clear, unified position. A number of NDPers, notably Manitoba MP Niki Ashton, have urged Canada to unequivocally support Maduro. But party leader Jagmeet Singh has tried to take a more nuanced approach. He has expressed the hope Venezuelans will figure things out for themselves, and he has pointedly refused to offer full-throated support to Venezuela¡¯s beleaguered president.</p> <p>Canada has interests in Venezuela; it is in our hemisphere and is a major supplier of oil and minerals. But there are no Canadian lives in immediate peril there.</p> <p>China is a different story. Canada now finds itself uncomfortably astride a deepening rift between the U.S., Canada¡¯s closest neighbour and biggest trading partner, and the world¡¯s most populous country.?</p> <p>Canadians in China are at immediate risk because of this conflict. The most at risk are Schellenberg and the two who were recently incarcerated. But there are many others who could face danger.</p> <p>It might be asking a lot, but Canadian politicians might think twice before turning Canada¡¯s current differences with China into a matter of partisan dispute.</p> <p>Politicians might all want to weigh their words very carefully before saying anything that could endanger the three Canadians at the eye of this political and diplomatic storm.</p> <p>?</p> <p>John McCallum:?Photo courtesy <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/premierofalberta/34178335420/in/photostream/">Premier of Alberta/Flickr</a></p> <div> <div> <div> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p>?</p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div></div></div> Mon, 28 Jan 2019 15:49:31 +0000 rabble staff 156441 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/trudeau-opens-himself-political-attacks-over-firing-mccallum#comments Canada¡¯s ambassador to China speaks truth, then recants https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/canada%E2%80%99s-ambassador-china-speaks-truth-then-recants <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/canada%E2%80%99s-ambassador-china-speaks-truth-then-recants"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/McCallum2.jpg?itok=YbPZBFJn" width="1180" height="600" alt="Photo: John McCallum flickr/ Day Donaldson" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>On Tuesday, January 22, Canada¡¯s ambassador to China, John McCallum, told a group of journalists who work for Chinese media or report in Chinese for Canadian media there was a good chance a Canadian court would deny the U.S. request to extradite Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. Then, two days later, he walked back his statement.</p> <p>Despite his claim that he misspoke, the Chinese now understand the Canadian government will almost certainly find a way to get Meng off the hook.</p> <p>McCallum¡¯s original point was that U.S. President Donald Trump prejudiced the American government¡¯s case when he said he would consider using Meng as a bargaining chip in trade talks with China.</p> <p>As well, the ambassador pointed out, the U.S. government¡¯s beef with Meng involves the breaching of sanctions against Iran -- sanctions Canada does not itself impose.</p> <p>That second argument was not entirely accurate. The American case against Meng is not, formally, about a breach of sanctions. Rather, U.S. authorities claim the Huawei executive told financial institutions that a Huawei subsidiary -- which might have done business in Iran -- was separate and independent from Huawei, which is not true. ?Her offence is thus, officially, bank fraud.</p> <p>The underlying issue, though, is flouting U.S. sanctions against Iran, and McCallum was only stating a fact when he said Canada has chosen not to go along with those punitive measures.</p> <p>And so McCallum¡¯s statement seems, on the face of it, eminently plausible and reasonable. Nonetheless, it engendered a firestorm of outraged comment.</p> <p>Pundits argued that when the ambassador dared say openly what everyone in Ottawa is saying privately, he somehow made the Liberal government¡¯s position vis-¨¤-vis the Chinese more difficult.</p> <p>Former Canadian ambassadors to China took to the airwaves to excoriate the current ambassador for breaching diplomatic reserve. McCallum was freelancing, they said, and could undermine the government¡¯s oft-repeated point about the independence of Canadian courts.</p> <p>The prime minister did not openly rebuke McCallum, but he came close.</p> <p>When journalists gave him the opportunity to give a full-throated defence of his ambassador, Justin Trudeau demurred. Instead, he ritualistically incanted his government¡¯s favourite talking point, to wit, ¡°Canada is rule-of-law country.¡±</p> <p>Conservative leader Andrew Scheer was not so circumspect. He called on Trudeau to fire the ambassador.</p> <p><strong>A hasty retreat</strong></p> <p>And so, by Thursday afternoon McCallum was in full retreat mode. He issued a news release that paid appropriate obeisance to the ¡°rule of law,¡± and then went on to say: ¡°I regret that my comments with respect to the legal proceedings of Ms. Meng have created confusion. ¡­ These comments do not accurately represent my position on this issue. As the government has consistently made clear, there has been no political involvement in this process.¡±?</p> <p>McCallum¡¯s seemingly accurate original statement is still out there, though, and cannot be erased from memory. And it is hard to imagine the ambassador acted impulsively or without forethought. He is an experienced politician, who held senior cabinet posts in the governments of three prime ministers.</p> <p>Ever since it detained the Huawei executive on what now appear to be shaky grounds, and engendered enormous Chinese ire in the process, the Canadian government has been grasping for a way out.</p> <p>McCallum¡¯s Tuesday statement could be part of that way out. It could be designed to placate the Chinese and assure them that, in due course, Meng will be free and clear of all charges.?</p> <p>The subtext, here, is that the Chinese have no need to retaliate against any Canadians, which they have done, in one case, to the extent of condemning him to death. McCallum wanted to reassure the Chinese that the independent Canadian courts, if they operate as one might expect them to, will almost certainly do the right thing by Meng.</p> <p>Even in his statement of retraction McCallum continued to reinforce that message.</p> <p>He prefaced his I-did-not-mean-it apology by affirming that ¡°Canada is conducting a fair, unbiased and transparent legal proceeding with respect to Meng Wanzhou, Huawei¡¯s chief financial officer, which includes the ability for individuals to mount a vigorous defence before a court of law.¡±</p> <p>McCallum has already provided Meng¡¯s lawyers with some fairly compelling arguments for their ¡°vigorous defence.¡±</p> <p><strong>The Chinese seem to have got the message</strong></p> <p>The ambassador¡¯s bottom line, like that of the prime minister, is that Canada wants to get its two incarcerated citizens back -- and, although they do not say as much, spare a third Canadian from execution.</p> <p>¡°Every action our government takes is focused on the safety and security of these Canadians,¡± McCallum concluded, adding: ¡°That will continue to be our absolute priority until they can return home.¡±</p> <p>The Chinese ambassador to Canada certainly seemed to get the message and to appreciate it. She said as much publicly.</p> <p>Some have suggested that McCallum did not have to speak out publicly. He could have made his argument to the Chinese government in private. Words spoken publicly, however, can have a stronger impact than the same words spoken <em>sotto voce,</em> behind closed doors.</p> <p>The Chinese now understand that, in the end, the Canadian government will almost certainly find a way to get Meng off the hook.</p> <p>And do not forget, in the unlikely event that a Canadian court were to grant the dubious U.S. extradition request, the final say as to whether or not to deliver this Chinese citizen to U.S. authorities lies at the political level, with the federal justice minister.</p> <p><em>Photo:<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/thespeakernews/25116644675/" rel="nofollow" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">?flickr/ Day Donaldson</a></em></p> <p>?</p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p>?</p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Fri, 25 Jan 2019 19:10:52 +0000 rabble staff 156371 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/canada%E2%80%99s-ambassador-china-speaks-truth-then-recants#comments New Liberal candidate running against NDP leader served for 16 years in right-of-centre B.C. governments https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/new-liberal-candidate-running-against-ndp-leader-served-16-years-right-centre-bc <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/new-liberal-candidate-running-against-ndp-leader-served-16-years-right-centre-bc"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/dick-lee.jpg?itok=7u6Iupw_" width="1180" height="600" alt="Richard Lee is the new Liberal candidate in the Burnaby South byelection on February 25" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>The federal Liberal party has named Richard Lee its new candidate to face-off against NDP leader Jagmeet Singh in the Burnaby South byelection on February 25, and their choice shows how politics can make strange bedfellows.</p> <p>On the face of it, Lee seems tailor made for the job.</p> <p>He was, after all, a Liberal member of the British Columbia legislature for 16 years, and he is now running for the federal Liberal party. The two parties -- the B.C. provincial Liberals and the federal Liberals -- are not, however, fraternal organizations. They are not even, for the most part, political allies. Indeed, the B.C. Liberals officially disaffiliated from the federal party nearly 30 years ago.</p> <p>In the 1990s, the B.C. Liberal party supplanted the now-defunct Social Credit party as the small-C conservative alternative to the NDP. And while it fancies itself a big-tent party of the centre-right and the right, the B.C. Liberals most fervent core supporters tend to be federal Conservatives. Those who vote Liberal federally in B.C. tend to split their allegiances, provincially, between the NDP and the Liberals.</p> <p>At times, the B.C. Liberal party calls itself a ¡°free enterprise coalition¡± party. It unabashedly leans to the right ideologically, although it did bring in a modest carbon tax, which sets it apart from other right-wing parties in Canada.</p> <p>There have been some notable B.C. Liberals who were active in the federal Liberal party. One such individual is former Liberal premier Christy Clark¡¯s ex-husband, Mark Marissen, who worked as an adviser to one-time federal Liberal leader St¨¦phane Dion.</p> <p>But such examples are overshadowed by the strong and enduring links between the B.C. Liberals and the federal Conservatives, and nobody exemplifies that relationship as well as long-time B.C. Liberal premier Gordon Campbell.</p> <p>Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper named Campbell to the prestigious post of High Commissioner to London, after the latter retired from politics. The former premier had left office under something of a cloud of scandal, and the new job Harper gave him helped renew his credentials as an important and influential power player.</p> <p><strong>Signing on for a partisan hit job </strong></p> <p>More recently, Ontario Conservative premier Doug Ford appointed Campbell to lead an inquiry into the spending habits of the defeated Kathleen Wynne Liberal government. Wynne and Justin Trudeau were close political allies.</p> <p>There might be some good reasons to root around in the financial records of the Wynne government, but most Liberals, be they in the federal or Ontario party, do not see it that way. To them, the exercise Campbell leads is nothing more than a political hit job.</p> <p>It is one thing to take on a non-partisan, public service role following a career in politics -- such as representing Canada abroad. It is quite another to get one¡¯s hands muddy in what appears to be a crassly partisan revenge game.</p> <p>None of this is directly linked to Lee.</p> <p>Still, Lee¡¯s political opponents in the current race might have some questions for him about the years he spent as a provincial Liberal in the B.C. legislature.</p> <p>Former Liberal candidate in the riding, Karen Wang, turned out to be an embarrassment, but the federal party could easily disassociate itself from her. It was the members of the federal Liberal riding association for Burnaby South who chose the now-disgraced Wang as their candidate, not the party leadership.</p> <p>In the case of Lee, it was the prime minister and his senior advisers who made the choice. Trudeau and the Liberal party brass will have difficulty disassociating themselves from anything Lee says or does, or any information that emerges about Lee, during the campaign that starts in earnest now.</p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Richard Lee/Facebook</em></p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Mon, 21 Jan 2019 20:41:26 +0000 rabble staff 156091 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/new-liberal-candidate-running-against-ndp-leader-served-16-years-right-centre-bc#comments NDP's Singh can prove his critics wrong, but must up his game https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/ndps-singh-can-prove-his-critics-wrong-must-his-game <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/ndps-singh-can-prove-his-critics-wrong-must-his-game"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/39953186114_abd12cef10_z.jpg?itok=FjQ5bvb_" width="1180" height="600" alt="Wayne Polk/Flickr" title="Wayne Polk/Flickr" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>NDP leader Jagmeet Singh¡¯s chances of winning the February 25 byelection in the British Columbia riding of Burnaby South look better by the day. But if he wins, he still has a long road in front of him heading into the fall general election.</p> <p>About a month ago, before the prime minister called the byelection for Burnaby South and two other ridings, the media were reporting polls that showed the NDP trailing badly in the B.C. riding. More recently, however, a new poll showed Singh quite comfortably in the lead.</p> <p>That newer poll came after the byelection call, but before the Liberal candidate was forced to step aside. Former candidate Karen Wang¡¯s offence was telling voters they should support her because she is Chinese, while Singh is Indian.</p> <p>Until the most recent developments, there had been a lot of chatter about what would happen if Singh were to lose the byelection.</p> <p>Former NDP leader Tom Mulcair said openly what others were thinking: Singh would have to quit, and the party would get itself a new leader before October¡¯s vote. That prospect, apparently, worried the Liberals. At least, that has been the conventional Ottawa insider opinion.</p> <p><strong>Liberals need a weak NDP to win again</strong></p> <p>The chattering class view is that the NDP is in trouble, what with poor fundraising results and mediocre poll numbers. And they lay the blame for that trouble at the leader¡¯s door. Singh has been weak and ineffective, they say. He is largely absent from Ottawa, and has been unable to articulate a clear, progressive message much at variance with that of the Liberals. ?</p> <p>If the Liberals have any hope for a second majority, the argument goes, they need the NDP to stay weak. Liberal and NDP votes are like a teeter-totter. When one side goes up, the other goes down.</p> <p>And so -- again, according to Ottawa insiders -- the Liberals have been not-so-secretly hoping for Singh to win the Burnaby seat and then lead his party to a dismal showing in the next election.</p> <p>Well, the Liberals might get their wish, or, at least, part of it. Singh is now an odds-on favourite to get himself a seat in the House of Commons on February 25.</p> <p>The second part of the Liberal wish list might not, however, be such a foregone conclusion.</p> <p>The next election will present very polarized options to the voters.</p> <p>There is a Conservative Party that, in effect, denies climate change, wants to radically tighten immigration and refugee rules, and lower taxes for the wealthy. In other words, it wants to return to the Harper era. Further to the right, there is Maxime Bernier¡¯s party that openly appeals to bigotry, while advocating a radical, Ayn-Rand-style reduction of the state, which would include ending Canada¡¯s supply-management system for agriculture.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the Trudeau Liberals, commentators say, have been offering the most progressive government Canada has seen in many decades. The Liberals have left little room on their port side for the NDP. In such a polarized environment, say the experts, potential NDP voters will flock to the Liberals -- especially given the fact that Singh has not done much to differentiate himself from Trudeau.</p> <p>Singh is in favour of electoral reform, while Trudeau betrayed his promise on that. But changing the electoral system is an arcane matter for most Canadians, not likely to sway many voters.</p> <p>Singh also opposes the Trans Mountain pipeline, which Trudeau¡¯s government now owns. But the NDP, as a party, is not united on that issue. Alberta¡¯s NDP government is 1,000 per cent for the pipeline.</p> <p><strong>Charisma and charm are not enough</strong></p> <p>When they chose Singh as leader, many NDPers seemed to be seeking the magical and ineffable quality of charisma Trudeau brought to the Liberals. They wanted someone very different from the cerebral, tough-talking, prosecutorial Mulcair -- a candidate who had the indefinable ability to ¡°connect,¡± to use Singh¡¯s own word.</p> <p>The view of Ottawa insiders is that what the NDP got, in the end, was someone who had all of Trudeau¡¯s flaws -- like a tendency to be vague on policy and a preoccupation with image to the detriment of substance -- and none of his strengths.</p> <p>The chattering class should not count its chickens, however, be they free market fowl or marketing-board hens.</p> <p>Singh has stumbled a few times since becoming leader. But those missteps have been the inevitable growing pains of a new leader. Many tend to forget that the late NDP leader Jack Layton made a few serious blunders of his own early in his tenure.</p> <p>In 2004, for instance, commentators excoriated Layton for suggesting that Liberal finance minister Paul Martin¡¯s austerity policies had caused the deaths of homeless people. The Liberals had, in fact, cut funds for affordable housing, but the commentariat faulted Layton because housing is largely a provincial, not federal, responsibility.</p> <p>The late NDP leader also alienated many potential supporters when he seemed to suggest his party would recognize the legitimacy of a Quebec vote to secede, even if carried only by a single vote. Layton¡¯s failure of leadership was not necessarily the party¡¯s nuanced and reasonable policy on the federal government¡¯s duty to negotiate in the event of a yes vote. It was his inability, at least at first, to convincingly explain that policy.</p> <p>In the end, Layton gained his political sea legs, and the NDP went on to increase its seat count in each of his four elections, culminating in the orange wave of 2011.</p> <p><strong>A clear vision and bold policies</strong></p> <p>Singh is still, by and large, an unknown and untested quantity, but he does bring a lot to the table. He has an accomplished career as a criminal defence and human rights lawyer and deputy leader of the Ontario NDP. He also has a compelling personal life story.</p> <p>In addition, when the next election rolls around, the Liberals will be running on their record, not merely on the prospect of getting rid of the nasty and negative Harper regime. They will have to answer not only for the promises they kept, but also for those they failed to keep.</p> <p>There are, for a start, the Liberals¡¯ failures to fully live up to their promises on both democratic reform and Indigenous rights. Those failures might matter to a lot of people to whom Ottawa insiders rarely speak.?</p> <p>In addition, the gulf between the top and bottom ends of the economic spectrum in Canada continues to grow, despite a bit of Liberal tinkering. That, too, could weigh in the balance for many voters who supported the Trudeau team last time. The Trudeau government¡¯s main measure to deal with poverty, to date, is a late-mandate, on-paper strategy they might or might not ever implement. Economic inequality could provide an obvious issue for Singh and the NDP.</p> <p>And finally, while the current government talks a good game on the environment and climate change, it has not significantly delivered results in the form of reduced emissions, as Canada¡¯s Environment Commissioner has reminded it more than once.</p> <p>All of this could provide ammunition for a reinvigorated Singh, if and when he wins a seat and enters the House of Commons as party leader.</p> <p>The NDP leader¡¯s big challenge will be to go beyond a critique, however trenchant, of the failures of the Trudeau government.</p> <p>In addition to tearing a strip off the Liberals for their many betrayals and failures, Singh will have to communicate a clear and compelling vision for his party. Even more important, he will need to articulate a muscular and tangible set of policies that would give life to that vision.</p> <p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cdncrooner/39953186114">Photo:?Wayne Polk/Flickr</a></p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Fri, 18 Jan 2019 17:28:27 +0000 rabble staff 155996 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/ndps-singh-can-prove-his-critics-wrong-must-his-game#comments Saving Robert Schellenberg will be a daunting task for Trudeau government https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/saving-robert-schellenberg-will-be-daunting-task-trudeau-government <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/saving-robert-schellenberg-will-be-daunting-task-trudeau-government"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/32405077100_33d83a0212_z.jpg?itok=ebELE-Rt" width="1180" height="600" alt="U.S. Department of State/Flickr" title="U.S. Department of State/Flickr" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>A Chinese court has sentenced Canadian Robert Lloyd Schellenberg to death for the crime of drug smuggling, and the Canadian government is taking two tracks in its efforts to save his life.</p> <p>Even before a regional Chinese court imposed the death sentence, the Trudeau government had asked Chinese authorities to exercise clemency in this case. So far, the response has been anything but favourable. The Chinese have reacted more in resentful and offended anger than in sorrow.</p> <p>The Canadian government is also taking another tack. It hopes to put pressure on the Chinese by rallying international support for Schellenberg and against the practice of execution</p> <p>?As Global Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland put it: "Canada's position when it comes to the death penalty is consistent and very long-standing. We believe it is inhumane and inappropriate. And wherever the death penalty is considered with regard to a Canadian, we speak out against it."</p> <p>In this sentiment, the minister can expect to find sympathy and support from member states of the European Union, from most Latin American countries, from Australia and New Zealand, and from South Africa and a number of other African countries which have recently banned executions.</p> <p>However, Freeland¡¯s statement of principle will not find much resonance immediately in the U.S., where even Democratic party politicians who privately oppose capital punishment fear the political consequences of saying so publicly.</p> <p>The last time a U.S. presidential candidate stated openly that he was against executions was in 1988, and it did not work out too well. During a televised debate, Democrat Michael Dukakis stated coolly and dispassionately that even if his own wife were brutally murdered, he would be opposed to the state exacting revenge and killing the perpetrator.</p> <p>That candour, combined with the vicious negative attacks George H.W. Bush¡¯s campaign waged against him, cost Dukakis the election.</p> <p><strong>Public support for executions in the U.S. and in Asia is high</strong></p> <p>These days, U.S. death penalty opponents like to point to some hopeful signs in their country. The rate of executions seems to be on the decline, at least somewhat. But a good many U.S. states still impose executions in arbitrary, unfair and cruel ways.</p> <p>Texas, for instance, has what it calls the ¡°law of parties,¡± which means a person who is ¡°party¡± to a criminal offence that results in murder ¨C for instance, the driver of the getaway vehicle ¨C can be condemned to death. There are also significant controversies surrounding the use of the most popular current method of killing prisoners, lethal injection. Over the past couple of years, there has been a horrific series of botched executions using the big needle, which amount to nothing less than torture.</p> <p>Despite these grisly truths, and the fact that the U.S. is the only country in the Americas that persists in employing the death penalty, American support for executions remains high, at well over 60 per cent, according to polls.</p> <p>For China, all available public opinion research indicates overwhelming support for the death penalty, especially for violent crimes. And, according to Amnesty International, China is the world <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2018/04/death-penalty-facts-and-figures-2017/">champion of executions</a>, although it is impossible to know the exact number of executions carried out annually by Chinese authorities. That information is kept secret, but Amnesty estimates it to be in the thousands.</p> <p>To date, Freeland has only been able to tout support for Canada¡¯s efforts to save Schellenberg from a number of Western countries, such as Germany.</p> <p>As yet, she has not been able to convince a single Asian country to take Canada¡¯s side in this effort. That might be because most of those countries -- including Japan, Indonesia and the Philippines -- still have the death penalty on their books. And most still use it, as does China, against convicted drug dealers.?</p> <p>The cruel fact is that the Canadian argument that the death penalty is barbaric and never justified has little resonance in much of the world. Even the more nuanced argument that, in the case of a crime not involving murder, such as Schellenberg¡¯s, imposing the death penalty is excessive, is likely to fall on deaf ears.</p> <p>The Chinese can reason: If the U.S. can blithely put to death mentally handicapped people and others only tangentially associated with the act of murder, as well as defendants who had manifestly incompetent defences, why shouldn¡¯t we use capital punishment to deter crimes we consider to be a grave threat to our social well being?</p> <p>In the final analysis, Canada¡¯s best chance of saving Schellenberg will not likely be moral suasion. Nor will appeals for mercy or pressure from a handful of other countries have much chance of success.</p> <p>It appears, at this stage, that the most effective way for the Trudeau government to save this Canadian¡¯s life would be to, somehow, find a way to end the extradition proceedings against Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou.</p> <p>Photo:?<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/statephotos/32405077100/in/photostream/">U.S. Department of State/Flickr</a></p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p>?</p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 16 Jan 2019 16:26:49 +0000 rabble staff 155871 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/saving-robert-schellenberg-will-be-daunting-task-trudeau-government#comments Will 2019 be the year of white backlash in Canada? https://www.google.com//48f/news/2019/01/will-2019-be-year-white-backlash-canada <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2019/01/will-2019-be-year-white-backlash-canada"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/8195514579_ec64acb479_z.jpg?itok=18A24ryE" width="1180" height="600" alt="Photo: proacguy1/Flickr" title="Photo: proacguy1/Flickr" /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>This is an election year in Canada, federally and in Alberta. Climate change -- and what to do or not do about it -- will be one unavoidable issue in the campaigns to come. The sniping on that has already started in earnest. The federal Conservative leader stands shoulder-to-shoulder with four provincial premiers promising to resist the carbon tax with all the force they can muster.</p> <p>But the climate and the environment will not be the only big issue.</p> <p>Identity and its twin, migration, are also shaping up to be major sources of political dispute in 2019. Again, it is the Conservatives who are on the attack, evoking the spectre of a flood of what they call illegal migrants into the country.</p> <p>Conservative leader Andrew Scheer has even tried to sow panic about an innocuous United Nations agreement Canada just signed.</p> <p>The <a href="https://refugeesmigrants.un.org/migration-compact">Global Pact on Migration</a> engages us to the not-very-radical idea that the nations of the world should treat all migrants humanely. As Sheer sees it, however, this bland, motherhood document, which affirms the need to respect migrants¡¯ human rights while discouraging xenophobia ¡°could open the door to foreign bureaucrats telling Canada how to manage our borders.¡±</p> <p>Such tactics are not new.</p> <p>The Harper Conservatives made an art form of trolling for votes by scapegoating targeted groups of migrants. They proudly and truculently cancelled funds for a small-budget refugee health program ¨C since restored by the Liberals ¨C and almost daily lashed out at ¡°queue-jumpers¡± who supposedly abuse Canada¡¯s refugee system to gain backdoor entry into the country.</p> <p><strong>White Christians fight back</strong></p> <p>There is, however, a newer and more disturbing noise we can expect to hear this coming year, and it is unabashedly and openly focused on race, quite specifically the white Christian race.</p> <p>The man who went to a Justin Trudeau town hall in Regina to tell the prime minister that ¡°Christianity and Islam don¡¯t mix¡± and that Muslims are ¡°coming here to kill us, yet you let them in¡± might represent nobody but himself. But there are plenty of others, with substantial followings, who are ready to stir the pot of white resentment.</p> <p>Maxime Bernier, leader of the breakaway right-wing Peoples¡¯ Party of Canada, is one of those.</p> <p>Bernier does not merely take issue with the UN Migration Compact; he dismisses the UN itself as a ¡°useless joke.¡± The world body, he says, and tweets repeatedly, seeks to impose a ¡°world government on Canada.¡±</p> <p>Earlier, as Bernier prepared to exit the Conservative party and found his own, he made his position on Canada¡¯s multicultural personality clear, when he said: ¡°Why should we promote ever more diversity? More diversity will not be our strength. It will destroy what has made us a great country.¡±</p> <p>The most fully elaborated statement of white backlash, of late, has come from veteran Quebec journalist and broadcaster Denise Bombardier, who is currently a columnist for the popular tabloid daily, <em>Le Journal de Montr¨¦al</em>.</p> <p>Bombardier has had a long and distinguished career in Quebec media, but of late she has taken to expressing anger and angst over foreign-born critics of white, North American -- and, in particular, Qu¨¦b¨¦cois -- society.</p> <p>Most recently, Bombardier reacted with fury and contempt to an open letter to the premier of Quebec penned by the anti-racist activist and supporter of the progressive Qu¨¦bec Solidaire party, Amel Zaazaa. <a href="https://www.ledevoir.com/opinion/idees/544447/l-etat-quebecois-est-il-reellement-neutre">In that letter,</a> published in the newspaper <em>Le Devoir</em>, Zaazaa says the current and fashionable Quebec notions of the neutrality of the state and of secularism are, in truth, the guises in which a racist system cloaks itself.</p> <p>Zaazaa talks about racial profiling by police services, which count pitiably few racial minorities among their members, of the lack of diversity in Quebec media, and of the fact that the Quebec National Assembly is almost entirely white.</p> <p>In particular, the activist points to prejudices and practices that exclude Muslims, especially Muslim women, from many positions. ?A large number of veiled Muslim women find work in daycare centres, Zaazaa writes, even though they are over-qualified, because they can find no other job. Now, she adds, the new Quebec government wants to deny them even that employment, simply because they choose to cover their faces.</p> <p><strong>Go out and discover ¡®white¡¯ Quebec</strong></p> <p>In her <a href="https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2019/01/04/une-donneuse-de-lecons">column of January 4</a>, Bombardier goes after Zaazaa hammer and tong.?Bombardier tells her readers that Zaazaa¡¯s narrow focus on the ¡°multicultural Qu¨¦bec¡± minority community in which she lives prevents her from realizing that Quebec, as a whole, is very much ¡°in the majority white.¡±??</p> <p>The columnist then offers a little history lesson to the immigrant activist.</p> <p>¡°Quebec was discovered by white French people,¡± she writes, ¡°and, in 1759, conquered by the white British.¡± (She makes no mention of the Indigenous people who lived in Quebec when it was ¡®discovered¡¯.)</p> <p>Bombardier accuses Zaazaa, who is of Tunisian origin, of behaving like many members of the ¡°bourgeoisie¡± of ex-French colonies, who claim to be ¡°implacable anti-colonialists,¡± while having benefited from the ¡°advantages of the colonizer.¡± She never specifies what those advantages are.</p> <p>Zaazaa, Bombardier says, should be careful not to impose ¡°foreign models¡± on the society that has welcomed her. The Tunisian immigrant should broaden her knowledge of that society beyond her own ethnically diverse urban enclave to ¡°Quebec outside of Montreal¡± ¨C in other words, to ¡°white¡± Quebec.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2019/01/05/les-quebecophobes">her next column, of January 5</a>, entitled ¡°The Qu¨¦b¨¦cophobes,¡± Bombardier broadens her attack to all minority groups that ¡°demand rights for themselves¡± while they ¡°denigrate white Qu¨¦b¨¦cois¡± who are, in their eyes, ¡°ill educated in the realities of the world.¡±?</p> <p>These ¡°trouble makers,¡± Bombardier writes, are ¡°dangerous ¡­ social pyromaniacs.¡± The Muslims among them, she says, give a bad name to the ¡°majority of Muslims in Quebec who behave like respectful and grateful citizens.¡± There is an ¡°urgent need,¡± Bombardier concludes, to ¡°extinguish¡± the ¡°intolerance¡± promulgated by these ¡°minority groups¡± who ¡°howl like wolves.¡±?</p> <p><strong>Whites will soon be minorities in the countries they ¡®discovered¡¯</strong></p> <p>Less than a week later, <a href="https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2019/01/11/le-declin-des-blancs">Bombardier offers yet another column</a> in the same general theme. This one is starkly entitled ¡°The Decline of the whites.¡±?</p> <p>The veteran journalist opens by noting the demographic fact that in many U.S. cities whites are already in the minority, and that by 2050, in such countries as Canada, New Zealand and the U.S., whites could become a minority group.</p> <p>She then quotes Canadian-raised and educated political scientist Eric Kaufman, author of <em>Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration and the Future of White Majorities, </em>who recently told the Radio-Canada television program <em>Le Point </em>that ¡°white identity must be considered an identity like the others, not an invention designed to maintain power. It is a set of myths and symbols with which whites identify.¡±</p> <p>Bombardier concludes this polemic by castigating ¡°those who denounce the whites and refuse to recognize the whites¡¯ legitimate worries about their own identity.¡± Those unnamed denouncers, says Bombardier, affirm their own ¡°black¡± or ¡°yellow¡± or ¡°Indigenous¡± identities, which they call ¡°racialized,¡± while they inevitably characterize whites as ¡°colonizers, slave-owners, racists, Islamophobes and other hurtful epithets.¡±</p> <p>There you have it. Virulent white backlash is alive and well and living in Canada.</p> <p>The year 2019 has barely begun, but in Bombardier¡¯s multiple expressions of anger and resentment, and in her wild and scattershot ad hominem attacks and condescending generalities about minority commentators, we can see the beginnings of a very uncivil and explosive political debate to come.?</p> <p>Fasten your seat belts.</p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p>Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/43312810@N04/8195514579">proacguy1/Flickr</a></p> <p>?</p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Mon, 14 Jan 2019 18:34:32 +0000 rabble staff 155741 at/48f /48f/news/2019/01/will-2019-be-year-white-backlash-canada#comments Experts give Trudeau government C grade for its action on Rohingya genocide https://www.google.com//48f/news/2018/12/experts-give-trudeau-government-c-grade-its-action-rohingya-genocide <div class="field field-name-taxonomy-vocabulary-14 field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Karl Nerenberg</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image-for-node field-type-image field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/news/2018/12/experts-give-trudeau-government-c-grade-its-action-rohingya-genocide"><img src="/48f/sites/default/files/styles/large_story_850px/public/node-images/14224917328_ec0e97fbe9_z_0.jpg?itok=gYHMwxCE" width="1180" height="600" alt="Photo Credit: Evangelos Petratos, Rakhine, Myanmar/Burma " title="Photo Credit: Evangelos Petratos, Rakhine, Myanmar/Burma " /></a></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Early in 2018, the Trudeau government promised to take vigorous measures to help the persecuted Rohingya of Myanmar, but an end-of-year report card by a group of experts and advocates gives the government only a mediocre C for its performance.</p> <p>In October 2017, the prime minister asked former Ontario premier Bob Rae to study the humanitarian crisis facing Myanmar¡¯s Rohingya, with a view to advising the government as to what Canada should do about it. In the latter half of 2017, violence in the southeastern Asian country of Myanmar targeted the Rohingya people, forcing more than half a million people to flee and triggering what has been described as the fastest growing humanitarian crises in the world.</p> <p>Rae¡¯s report, in March of 2018, underscored the grim reality of the crisis and recommended Canada take a ¡°leadership role ¡­ by stepping up humanitarian and development efforts.¡±</p> <p>The former premier proposed the government commit $600 million over four years to a variety of measures, including ¡°the necessary work on accountability and the gathering of evidence.¡± In other words, a key part of Canada¡¯s role should be to identify those responsible for the crisis and find ways to hold them to account.</p> <p><strong>Recognition of genocide, but no effort to pursue civilian leaders</strong></p> <p>As the year comes to an end, a group that includes human rights institutes at the University of Ottawa and Concordia University, and the Rohingya Human Rights Network, which brings together experts and advocates throughout the country, has evaluated and graded the government¡¯s actions, or lack thereof, subsequent to Rae¡¯s mission.</p> <p>On the money issue, the group gives Canada a solid B.</p> <p>The government did not go for Rae¡¯s $600-million suggestion. It did, however, commit half as much, over a shorter period ¨C three years rather than four. The advocates and experts welcome this commitment, but add that had the government gone all the way for the full amount they would have given it an A.</p> <p>The group did award a grade of A for the initiative Canada¡¯s parliament took in September of 2018, when it voted unanimously to recognize the persecution of the Rohingya as a genocide, and revoked Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi¡¯s honourary Canadian citizenship.? Canada¡¯s was the first national parliament to officially label the crisis as a genocide.</p> <p>At the other end of the spectrum, the group is extremely disappointed with Canada¡¯s failure to take concrete measures to ¡°address the source of the crisis, namely an official policy of genocide against the Rohingya people.¡±? The group notes that ¡°despite a year of calls by the Rohingya Human Rights Network and others for the government to invoke the United Nations Genocide Convention ¨C a treaty that was created for exactly this type of situation ¨C Canada has failed to take any action in this direction ¡­¡±</p> <p><strong>In an election year, will the politicians notice?</strong></p> <p>The Trudeau government earns only middling C grades in two other areas: taking tangible actions to ¡°hold Myanmar¡¯s leaders accountable for crimes against the Rohingya¡± and ¡°working with other nations and the international community to address the crisis.¡±</p> <p>On the accountability front, the Canadian government has focused exclusively on a few leading members of Myanmar¡¯s military, and has applied sanctions to only one of those. It is a mistake, the group argues, to ignore the culpability of the civilian leadership as well.</p> <p>¡°It was under the watch of the civilian government,¡± they point out, ¡°that the mass murders, gang rapes and destruction of Rohingya villages took place. Their actions, or failure to act, created the conditions for the crimes.¡±</p> <p>As for rallying others in the world community, the group recognizes that Canada has, in a pro forma way, evoked the Rohingya crisis at meetings of the G-7 and APEC (Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation). The group is deeply disappointed, however, that ¡°there is no indication Canada and its allies are in any way involved in a united effort to address the broader issues of the crisis, beyond the humanitarian component and a few avenues for individual accountability.¡±</p> <p>Officials at Global Affairs Canada will, no doubt, take note of this report card, which comes from a group of respected and knowledgeable folks.</p> <p>Elected politicians, on the other hand, are now quite obsessively focused on the looming election, which will take place in October of 2019.</p> <p>Politicians who worry about being re-elected might not be inclined to publicly agonize over the suffering of people half a continent away. They are more likely to worry about such home turf phenomena as the stubborn resistance of many voters to even modest measures to fight global warming and the brewing backlash against refugees.</p> <p>The report card from the Rohingya experts and supporters might serve a helpful purpose if it reminds the Liberals that they did make some fairly major rhetorical commitments vis-¨¤-vis the Rohingya, not too long ago. That rhetoric has yet to be fully matched by action.</p> <p>Photo Credit: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/eu_echo/14224917328/in/photostream/">Evangelos Petratos, Rakhine, Myanmar/Burma?</a></p> <p><em>Karl Nerenberg has been a journalist and filmmaker for more than 25 years. He</em>?<em>is rabble's politics reporter.</em></p> <p><em>Help make rabble sustainable. Please consider supporting our work with a monthly donation.?</em><a href="https://secure.rabble.ca/donate/" style="text-decoration-line: none; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><em>Support</em></a><em>? เกมออนไลน์ www.populertarih.com today for as little as $1 per month!</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/gHiRw1UH8_TvnePf0FX3OR0DFt8Eg7psqo22P---V6yaHFl1r17Q-1rfQeSdE8ZZE15st4vjgC-Aqa_ius7hpomIYn7AUrH-0dDl69E07h5wGKqG_lmZD-yODEEbo-0Yf5GMxFp9" style="border:none; height:79px; max-width:100%; transform:rotate(0rad); width:358px" /></em></p> </div></div></div> Mon, 24 Dec 2018 16:49:41 +0000 rabble staff 155121 at/48f /48f/news/2018/12/experts-give-trudeau-government-c-grade-its-action-rohingya-genocide#comments